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8 April, 23:05

Explain why the solutions of SbCl3 (aq) in our lab also contain HCl. Why would adding a few drops of this solution to 300 mL of water result in a foggy or cloudy appearance?

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  1. Yesterday, 00:06
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    Here's what I get

    Explanation:

    SbCl₃ reacts with water to form slightly soluble antimony oxychloride.

    SbCl₃ (aq) + H₂O (ℓ) ⇌ SbOCl (s) + 2HCl (aq)

    Your observation is an example of Le Châtelier's Principle in action,

    The SbCl₃ (aq) in your lab has enough HCl added to push the position of equilibrium to the left and keep the SbOCl in solution.

    If a few drops of the SbCl₃ (aq) were added to 300 mL of water, the solution would turn cloudy. The HCl would be so dilute that the position of equilibrium would lie to the right, and a cloudy precipitate of antimony oxychloride would form.
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