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22 January, 16:52

Read this excerpt from "Crossing the Bar" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. Which two lines are examples of a dependent clause?

A. (Sunset and evening star,)

And one clear call for me!

And may there be no moaning of the bar,

B. (When I put out to sea,)

But such a tide as moving seems asleep.

C. (Too full for sound and foam,)

D. (When that which drew from out the boundless deep)

Turns again home.

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  1. 22 January, 17:06
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    The correct answer is B)

    Explanation:

    A) First, a clause is an incomplete sentence or a group of words that can't stand alone or one that does not have meaning standing by itself.

    B) Furthermore, it must have a verb and a subject.

    A verb, if you recall is an action word while a subject is "the person or thing being referred to".

    Looking at the clauses in option B we can see that they both meet the above conditions.

    Let's see clause one - "And may there be no moaning of the bar, "

    It is clear that the verb here is "moaning" while the subject is "the Bar".

    It's clear to see that these group of words meet the conditions given in A and B above because left by themselves, they make no meaning.

    Let's take a look at the second clause:

    "When I put out to sea,"

    "I" here is the subject. It is a pronoun. A pronoun is simply a word that can be used instead of the noun. That is a noun can easily but inserted in the place of "I". Hence, we have "I" as the subject.

    "Put Out" here is a verb which means to relocate.

    So "When I put out to sea" also meets the conditions in A and B above.

    Cheers!
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